WORLD AGEING ORGANIZATION (WAO)


18/09/2020




News Centre -TDO- World Ageing Organization (WAO) established  by Gerontolog Dr.Kemal Aydın founder of World Ageing Council. WAO established in Europe after United Nations II. World Ageing Assembly 2002 under Turkish Dutch Healthcare Foundation and 2009 in Turkey after 2005 World Ageing Summit under the World Ageing Society (WAS).

United Nations 75th General Assembly World Ageing Council is initiated with collaboration Turkish Government World Ageing Decade (2020-2030).

On 14 December 1990, the United Nations General Assembly (by resolution 45/106) designated 1 October the International Day of Older Persons. This was preceded by initiatives such as the Vienna International Plan of Action on Ageing – which was adopted by the 1982 World Assembly on Ageing – and endorsed later that year by the UN General Assembly.

In 1991, the General Assembly (by resolution 46/91) adopted the United Nations Principles for Older Persons. In 2002, the Second World Assembly on Ageing adopted the Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing, to respond to the opportunities and challenges of population ageing in the 21st century and to promote the development of a society for all ages. Globally, there were 725 million persons aged 65 or over in 2020. The region of Eastern and South-Eastern Asia was home to the largest number of older persons (261 million), followed by Europe and Northern America (over 200 million).

Over the next three decades, the number of older persons worldwide is projected to more than double, reaching more than 2 billion persons in 2050. All regions will see an increase in the size of the older population between 2020 and 2050. The largest increase (312 million) is projected to occur in Eastern and South-Eastern Asia, growing from 261 million in 2019 to 573 million in 2050. The fastest increase in the number of older persons is expected in Northern Africa and Western Asia, rising from 29 million in 2019 to 96 million in 2050 (an increase of 226 per cent). The second fastest increase is projected for sub-Saharan Africa, where the population aged 65 or over could grow from 32 million in 2019 to 101 million in 2050 (218 per cent). By contrast, the increase is expected to be relatively small in Australia and New Zealand (84 per cent) and in Europe and Northern America (48 per cent), regions where the population is already significantly older than in other parts of the world.

Among development groups, less developed countries excluding the least developed countries will be home to more than two-thirds of the world’s older population (1.1 billion) in 2050. Yet the fastest increase is projected to take place in the least developed countries, where the number of persons aged 65 or over could rise from 37 million in 2019 to 120 million in 2050 (225 per cent).

Contact: Gerontolog Dr.Kemal AYDIN, 0533 475 94 62 turkyas2030@gmail.com

World Ageing Organization (WAO) Mesrutiyet Caddesi 26/1 Kızılay – Ankara


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