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June 2017 Issue 112



DIPLOMATIC OBSERVER MAGAZINE JUNE 2017 (112) ISSUE

 

MONGOLIA’S FOREIGN POLICY: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES

By Bold RAVDAN

Mongolia is one of two classically landlocked countries in the world that is sandwiched between the two giants. It surrounded by two major Orthodox and Confucian civilizations, two major markets that engage 20 per cent of the world’s population, and finally, two powerful nuclear powers. Therefore, besides to adopt to these circumstances, the establishment of firm connection with the outside world has become a strong will for Mongolians for a long time.

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AZERBAIJAN THE PEARL OF ISLAMIC CULTURE

By Faig BAĞIROV

As one of the most important centres of the Islamic civilization Azerbaijan has played an important role in spreading out the Islamic religion and the formation of the Islamic Renaissance. All of these created the conditions for the establishment of the material and intangible cultural heritage of the Islamic religion in Azerbaijan. The Shamaha Juma Mosque, built in 743, and the old manuscripts preserved at the museums of Azerbaijan are obvious examples of this.

You can read the rest of the article in May issue         

THE GUBA MASSACRE

By Ali ERDİNÇ      

April 24th is a date of commemoration brought forward by circles who support claims of alleged Armenian genocide every year. However, while losses resulting from the relocation in Anatolia are thus remembered, the same circles turn a consciously blind eye to and completely ignore the massacres and genocide carried out by Armenian gangs in Anatolia, Caucasia, Azerbaijan and even as far as Fergana/Kokand in Central Asia.

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IRANIAN PRESENCE IN IRAQ: IRAN’S IRAQI STRATEGY

By Yeşim DEMİR  

The Middle East, which is a bridge between the East and the West, is one of the most attention worthy regions of the world due to its underground wealth and its sacred locations for three major religions. It has been a field of conflict for major powers throughout history and every state that has tried to gain itself a strong position in the international system has tried to increase its influence over this region.

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LEBANON’S POLITICAL FUTURE AND “DIPLOMATIC” LEADER MICHEL AOUN

By İlknur Şebnem ÖZTEMEL    

Lebanon: With the Druze, Maronites, Sunnis, Shiites, Orthodox, Armenians, Arabs and Palestinian refugees it is home to, the “Mirror of the Middle East”. Lebanon surrounded by minefields, in the midst of confusion, having experienced the worst of infighting and never able to protect itself from the dangers of the outside world. Between 1975-1990, it experienced one of the most devastating civil wars in history.

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NOSTALGIA FOR THE COLD WAR

By Baybars ÖĞÜN

In international relations, the debate often comes locked down in the distinction among uni-polarism, bi-polarism and multi-polarism. It is assumed, enchanted by the dizzying speed of the information current and technological advances that globalisation has made pluralism natural. While it is a separate issue whether boundaries have been lifted in daily life, in international relations it is as though globalisation works differently.

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HEGEMONY IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE- 1

By Kaan DERVİŞOĞLU  

The concept of “hegemony” implies, on the one hand, the exercise of power, while on the other hand it denotes the systematic order in which states rise and fall. The concept of “world hegemony” points to the ability of states to lead the hegemonic order of states. Historically, the changes in the system of states led by a hegemonic state have required a revolutionary activity that changes the method by which the system functions.

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CHINA’S HISTORY MAKING MOVE: THE NEW SILK ROAD

By Mahmut ŞAHİN

At the end of the 20th century, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the USA remained as the only superpower and it was thought that the world would remain uni-polar. The USSR had fallen and Russia had turned to its internal problems. The USA was unrivalled. The USA had begun acting like the governor of the world as the sole superpower and intervened around the world. But in the field, things did not go as well as expected and the USA faced challenges.

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THE NEW US POLICY TOOLKIT FOR AFGHANISTAN

By Syed Ali Zia JAFFERY          

US National Security Adviser Gen H.R. McMaster has said that the Trump administration is working on a policy which would apply to both Pakistan and Afghanistan, and would be announced soon.

The USA is thinking about a military-heavy policy option to turn the tables in Afghanistan since it employed the GBU 43 bomb against the IS last month in Nangarhar.

You can read the rest of the article in June issue

REASONS BEHIND THERESA MAY’S DECISION TO HOLD A SNAP ELECTION

By Dilek YİĞİT       

On April 18th, 2017, British Prime Minister Theresa May announced her decision to hold snap elections, which came as a surprise to the British people and those who follow UK politics. While there had been rumours of early elections in the UK, May had insisted that there would be none. Given Theresa May’s insistence that no snap elections would be held, it was expected that the next general election in the UK would take place according to the normal schedule, in 2020.

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MACRON WINS THE PRESIDENCY!

By Robert HARNEIS

Emmanuel Macron was elected President of France on May 8th with a comfortable 66 per cent majority, as expected. To be anything other than a smooth-talking figurehead he must now win himself a majority in the National Assembly. The polls indicate that this will happen. There is a tradition that the electorate is logical and votes a parliamentary majority for the newly elected president.

You can read the rest of the article in June issue       

INTERVIEW WITH TAREK CHERIF

By Adel TAYARI    

Since its foundation in 2011, not only has CONECT defended its members who are investors, but it went even further into presenting ingenious solutions to free the Tunisian economy from a bottleneck. In this interview, the President of CONECT, Tarek Cherif gives his opinion about the investment climate in Tunisia and the different hardships that have led to the remarkable decline in the growth rate over the last years, besides the different perspectives of the organization as to how to promote the economy.

You can read the rest of the article in June issue     

BEIJING AND PYONGYANG: A TUMULTUOUS RELATIONSHIP

By Maximillian Christen MØRCH        

China has long been North Korea’s sole ally, with the isolated nation relying on China’s vital trade and its protection in the UN. Yet following recent missile launches and nuclear tests, China is starting to cool towards its troublesome neighbour. After decades of friendship Beijing may finally be loosening its handshake with Pyongyang.

You can read the rest of the article in June issue     

AN OBJECTIVE LOOK AT THE LABOUR ISSUES IN THE BALKANS

By Zeljko VESELINOVIC

I am the president of one of five trade unions active at the national level. Serbia is not a big country. Its population numbers 8 million inhabitants, of which about 1,700,000 have jobs and about 800,000 are out of jobs. About 1,600,000 pensioners live in Serbia. All this makes Serbia the country with the highest unemployment rate in Europe if judged by official statistics. Unofficial statistics indicate that the rate is even higher and unemployment more devastating. 

You can read the rest of the article in June issue      

25TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BLACK SEA ECONOMIC COOPERATION ORGANISATION

By Elif Özge AKÇA          

Istanbul is an affluent city between the Black Sea and the Aegean that has over 16 centuries served as the capital of four different empires: The Roman, Byzantine, Latin and Ottoman.  The Golden Horn once served as a minor port with the increase in passage between Anatolia and Thrace and later became a harbour for all ships. The people of Istanbul initially engaged in fishery and husbandry, while in later years they turned to trade. Today they play host to the 25th Anniversary meeting of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation Organisation (BSECO).

You can read the rest of the article in June issue

TURKEY NEEDS AN EFFECTIVE ANTI-CORRUPTION STRATEGY

By Cahit UYANIK  

Corruption is as old as human history.  A Sumerian tablet dating back to 2000 BCE is taken to be the first document ever produced on corruption. In the tablet known as the Sumerian Schooldays, a student who is not successful at school is mentioned and it is said his family wanted him to succeed at school. To this end they invite the boy’s teacher to their house. They give the teacher a feast as well as various gifts. The tablet states that the whole night was passed this way and that later the unsuccessful student became the top of his class all of a sudden. The lazy pupil is even made class president.

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THE DOGONS MYSTIC PEOPLE OF MALI

By Gökhan ŞEKEROĞLU          

The Dogon are a people living in the Western African country Mali. Their population is estimated at 700,000 people. They occupy the area from the cliff of Bandiagara to the southwest of the Niger loop. Some Dogon are settled in northern Burkina Faso. The Dogon are primarily cultivators (mainly of millet) and blacksmiths. They are famous for their cosmogony and their sculptures.

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PLIGHT OF THE ROHINGYA: MODERN DAY PERSECUTION

By Zeeshan MUNIR         

The migrant crisis in Southeast Asia, beginning in 2012 has brought the plight of the Rohingya Muslim community of Myanmar into the limelight. Thousands of Rohingya Muslims have become refugees in neighboring countries due to the discriminatory policies of the Burmese government in the Rakhine state. The slow response of Myanmar’s neighbors to take in refugees, citing various political and economic reasons, has compounded the plight of this oppressed community.

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INTERVIEW WITH CONDUCTOR ÖZGEN GÜRBÜZ

By Bahar Baştaş ÖZDEMİR       

I was born in the Merzifon district of Amasya on April 15th 1951. My mother was called Fehmiye and my father was Hüseyin GÜRBÜZ, later a retired principle of Ankara Atatürk High School. I’m the oldest among my siblings and I have a sister and a brother. I have a wife, Hilâl and two children Zeynep Merve (1986) and Yiğit (1989).

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A WINDOW ON HISTORY

By Sıddık YILDIZ  

The Amasya Directive is one of the most important documents of the Republic of Turkey and the Turkish War of Independence. Its significance lies in stating that the Republic of Turkey is established by the people themselves and in laying out the aims and methods of liberating the country from occupation as per the terms of the Mudros Armistice.

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REMEMBERING MOHAMMED ALI

By Onur BİLGİÇ    

For Cassius Clay, the gold he won at the 1960 Rome Olympics was a turning point. His period as an amateur athlete was over and his professional career had begun. His next aim was to win the world heavyweight title. Between 1960-63, he won all 19 matches he played, 15 of them with a knockout.  Having defeated Henry Cooper on June 18th, 1963, Clay was a world star at the age of 21.

You can read the rest of the article in June issue

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