DIPLOMATIC OBSERVER MAGAZINE MAY 2017 (111) ISSUE IS RELEASED




DIPLOMATIC OBSERVER MAGAZINE MAY 2017 (111) ISSUE

 

French Presidential Elections May 7th

Robert Harneis

The two finalists are Marine Le Pen of the National Front and Emmanuel Macron of En Marche (Forward!). The main debate is about the EU – in or out - crossed with a crusade by the political class against the National Front. The election features the amazing rise of Emmanuel Macron from complete obscurity three years ago to odds-on favorite to win. It is about the long-term aim of the National Front to become one of the leading parties of government.

You can read the rest of the article in May issue

 

EURO-MUSLIM IDENTITY TRANSFORMATION

Yusuf Fırıncı

We are living in an era of which millions of people suffer from invasions, regional divide and rule conflict building projects, trade and economic rivalties, proxy wars,  ethnic cleansings,  globally promoted radicalisms and terrorist networks.

The world civilization has not reached to a level of wisdom to counter covered interest strategies of the powerful rulers and can not really prevent sufferings in real life.

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The Ghost of The Realist State

Baybars Öğün

At the dawn of the 21st century there were claims that the state would lose its settled place in practice and in minds. Accordingly, the state-centric approach of the realist school has lost much in theory and in practical application. It was said that the globalising world would not endure borders. A new age in which non-state actors standing up for cooperation and peace would overcome the warlike instincts of states. The idea of people for the state would be replaced by the idea of the state for the people.

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Meeting of Senator McCain and Maryam Rajavi

Mesud Dalvand

Friday, April 14, 2017, Senator John McCain, Chair of the U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee, met with Maryam Rajavi in Tirana. They discussed the latest developments in Iran, the Iranian regime’s criminal meddling in the region, as well as the future prospects.

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China’s Journey to Africa 

İlknur Şebnem Öztemel

As Zunxian has it, the Spanish bull, the English lion, the French cockerel, German and American eagles have all visited this continent before.  They took away much and left much that can be considered useful. It seems that the Chinese dragon is the next. However, China is late to the game. China has arrived in Africa at a time in which the entire world hears of one’s actions, when people on the continent are more aware of colonialism and decolonization and when the continent is quite crowded to begin with.

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The China-Pakistan Economic Corridor and Indian divergences around One China 

Maximillian Christen Morch

While much has been written about the threat posed by India and Pakistan’s deteriorating relations, political tensions in South Asia are naturally not solely limited to the Indo-Pak drama. The rise of China has seen it become a major economic and hegemonic power in South Asia. This has produced a new rival to India’s inherent and previously unchallenged regional power in the region. Yet as India and China struggle and compete for power, could this competition be unsettling the region?

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REPUBLICANISM-CONSTITUTIONALISM DEBATE IN TURKEY, 1922-1923

Laçin Akyıl

At the Congress of Sivas which was held on September 4th-11th 1919, all groups in Turkey had gathered under the name Müdafaa-i Hukuk Cemiyeti (Association for the Defence of the Law) and united. During the first Assembly, in time different groupings such as Tesanüt (Solidarity), İstiklal (Independence), Islahat (Reform), the People’s Group (which were considered left wing) and Müdafaa-i Hukuk Groups formed by adherent of the Kuvay-i Milliye (irregular armed forces) emerged.

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A Window on History

Sıddık Yıldız

May 1st Labour Day

May 1st Labour Day is celebrated throughout the world by workers to focus on solidarity, unity and combating injustice against workers. It is an official holiday in many countries around the world. In Turkey, it was officially celebrated for the first time in 1923. In April 2008, it was decided that May 1st should be celebrated as the Labour and Solidarity Day. With a law passed by the GNAT on April 22nd 2009, May 1st was made an official holiday.

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EXPECTATIONS FOR NEW STRUCTURAL REFORMS IN THE TURKISH ECONOMY AND BETTER RELATIONS WITH EU DELAYED TO 2018

Cahit UYANIK

With the “Yes” vote winning the April 16th 2017 referendum on the constitution, Turkey has entered a very critical phase. Representatives of the business world have voiced their demands for structural reforms, which have long been awaited, loudly as soon as the results were announced. They said and the newspapers reported: “There have been four elections (local, presidential and two general) as well as a referendum since Spring 2014. There has been the coup attempt.

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The Decline of the West and the Ascent of the East?

Mahmut ŞAHİN

East and West. Two geographical directions. These two concepts allow us to describe where we are and where we are headed. But is the East and the West limited to this? Of course not. Beyond describing directions, the East and the West are deep concepts. The two terms denote a civilisation, ideology and culture. More than directions, they connote the cultures they stand for.

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MODI PUTS PRESSURE ON CIVIL SOCIETY IN INDIA

Dilek YİĞİT

In recent political science, the opinion is prevalent that representative democracy, which has made democracy applicable to the modern state, should be augmented with practices of participatory democracy. According to these views, while the significance of representative democracy is a given, in light of the criticism of political parties, elections and vote counting systems, democracies need participatory democracy practices to be stronger.

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Indo-Pak Ties: Treading a Dangerous Course

Syed Ali Zia Jaffery

Wars, skirmishes and open acrimony have been typical of the relationship between India and Pakistan ever since their inception as sovereign states. Unresolved disputes and by-crises have marred peace in South Asia. The Indo-Pak rivalry has merited extensive scholarship from across the globe owing to a host of factors which are well-documented. Hostilities continue to fester because of the inability to find amicable solutions to outstanding issues, especially the Kashmir conflict.

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FORMER DIPLOMAT TALKS ABOUT HER NEW CAREER IN ENTERTAINMENT

Gökhan ŞEKEROĞLU

 

Özlem Topses, you started your professional career as a diplomat. Tell us how that came about.

At first being a diplomat seemed an impossible dream to me. I started my university education at the Department of International Relations of the Faculty of Political Science of the University of Ankara, when I was 16. I didn't believe that I could become a diplomat because I worried that my English, my knowledge and my skills would be inadequate. Growing up, my life was all about music, children, animals and nature.

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Changing Character of War and Asymmetrical Warfare

Kaan Dervişoğlu

The concept of “war” is interesting in terms of its definition and the causes that are thought to underlie it. While sometimes the cause for war may be seen as a single individual or event, sometimes general causes are put forward that are thought to cause all wars. It may be said that many researchers in the field are critical of theories that purport one cause for all wars and try to pinpoint it. To tie down all wars to a single cause is seen as an unfounded approach and comprehensive analyses of individual wars are called for.

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Russia-Armenia Ties

Gülsüm Gizem Özyol

Historical ties between Armenians and Russians go back in time. From the 19th century onwards, Russia has supported non-Muslim groups within the Ottoman Empire and given them a place within its strategies. In this framework, Armenians were thought of as a type of barrier between the Ottomans and the Russians and efforts were made to collect the Armenian population in the eastern parts of the empire. Despite these efforts, Russia took precautions to prevent Armenians from becoming the majority in any part of its own territory.

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The return of the Tunisian jihadists from Syria and Iraq

Adel Tayari

Like all other countries around the world, Tunisia suffers from the threat of terrorism. It has been the scene of serious terrorist operations which had a negative impact on its declining economy and deepened its crisis. The terrorist phenomenon in Tunisia is not an outcome of the post-revolutionary period. Tunisia witnessed serious terrorist acts during the former regime, such as Al Ghriba in Djerba in 2002, which targeted European pilgrims to the synagogue there, killing 16 people, most of them German Jews, and the 2006 Suleiman incident.

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A VICTORY AT THE HAGUE

Umut Eren Özkan

In the years, Turkey was a young state, on the night of August 2nd 1926, The coal ship Bozkurt flying the Turkish flag collided with the French passenger ship Lotus off Lesbos in the Aegean. As a result of the collision, the Bozkurt broke apart in half and eight of its crew went missing. The crew of the Lotus saved some of the crew of the Bozkurt and brought them to Istanbul.  Relatives of those who went missing from the Bozkurt appealed to Turkish authorities and from August 3rd onwards, Turkish officials began an investigation on the Lotus to determine the manner of collision.

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WOMAN

Nihavent

@nihaventce

 

A soul as bright, rare and unique as a star.

A woman who can see with her soul while looking with her eyes, who can feel with her soul, who would not refrain from giving up her life.

Life tires a woman with new paths, surprises and challenges every day.   

A woman makes sacrifices to stay standing. 

She thinks that being a good mother should be her greatest quality and lives accordingly.

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THE CARBON FOOTPRINT

Mete ersöz

Every day we undertake various activities, which do not need to be novel or special.  Every day we walk, drive, store foot in plastic containers, eat meat and many similar things. Our every action influences the world we live in one way or the other. It may be a positive or a negative effect.  It is humans that are the dominant species on Earth and it is inevitable that we interact with the environment at an individual level. The sum of this interaction is our carbon footprint.

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THE PLACEBO AND NOCEBO EFFECTS

Neşe Sümer

We’ve all had headaches, stomach aches and muscle pain after exercise.  On such days, someone recommends medicine that we’ve never heard of before and once we’ve taken it all pain goes away miraculously. Leaving aside the risks of taking medicine without consulting a doctor, the medicine which we think really works might not be working at all. It is the placebo effect that is acting to relieve our pain.

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Interview with Sylvain Cherokee Ngue , the Coach of Turkish National Rugby Team

Onur Bilgiç

Rugby is a popular sport around the world. There are domestic leagues in many countries. At the international level, the Rugby World Cup has been organized since 1987 and the Six Nations Cup is an annual European Championship. But in Turkey it’s a new sport. Sylvain Cherokee Ngue is a former international rugby player. He has been coaching since the end of his playing career. After he came to Turkey, he has the coached METU (ODTÜ) and Hacettepe University rugby teams. Now he is the coach of the Turkish national team. 

You can read the rest of the article in May issue

 

“ONLY (SADECE)” Kalben

News Center[i]

Kalben… A true artist who reaches out to us as though she is our inner voice, despite having never met her, who makes us feel the healing hands of music, who warms the heart with every word she sings and every note she plays. But beyond all that she is someone who lives for pleasure, a free spirit, an idealist and an easygoing person. I first came across her when I first heard her sincere voice on a TV add.   She sang a very well-known song with a unique, clouded voice that did not try hard to be special. I went after this voice.

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